2/20/09

Spinach Ravioli with Sage Butter Sauce

It’s been a while since I’ve made this family favorite. It’s a dish that makes me wish I were Italian. It never fails, every time I make it, I envision myself in a sunny Tuscany kitchen, with seven kids running around … none of which are mine, because, let’s face it, I’m a traditional Italian, therefore, a virgin.
Look, as disturbing as this thought bubble may seem, it is still my thought bubble, ok?

So, there I am, all decked out in my flour-y apron, paired with the stereotypical black, orthopedic shoes, which only help to accentuate the sexy nylon hose, neatly rolled around my ankles, while wrestling an unruly mass of pasta dough, preparing the following Italian feast.



...and now, for my talent portion...I give you, Sage. The Sage I grew with my two little hands.The Sage I rescued last Fall by bringing it into the house. The Sage that is presently blooming, under my care. In February. Somebody catch me!

Ker plunk!



Spinach Ravioli with Sage Butter Sauce

Fresh Pasta

2 cups all-purpose flour
½ cup Semolina
½ teaspoon salt
3 large eggs, lightly beaten with 1 teaspoon olive oil

In food processor, pulse first three ingredients together. Gradually pour in the egg mixture and process until it just starts to gather into a ball. Wrap and keep refrigerated until filling is made.

Ravioli Filling

10 ounces of spinach, washed and stemmed
1 pound whole milk ricotta
3 ounces of mascarpone *
1 large egg
3 ounces of grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
Pinch of nutmeg

Cook the spinach in a large pot of boiling, salted water for 30 seconds.
Drain thoroughly. Set aside to cool a bit. Squeeze as much liquid as possible from the spinach, and finely chop.
In a medium bowl, combine the ricotta, mascarpone, egg, Parmigiano Reggiano, and nutmeg, until smooth. Fold in finely chopped spinach. Season with salt to taste.

Bring the pasta out, and place a bowl over it to keep from drying out while you work.
With a pasta machine or rolling pin, roll out the pasta dough as thin as possible.
I used a KA pasta attachment. I initially fed the pasta through the machine at its widest setting and ran it through to #5. I feel this is thin enough for making ravioli.



Cut the dough into 4 sheets, measuring 6 inches by 18 inches. Using a small ice cream scoop, I placed a row of filling down the center of 2 pasta sheets, spacing the filling 2 inches apart.



With a skinny, artist brush, brush around the filling with water. Quickly cover the filled pasta sheets with the two remaining pasta sheets. Press around each mound of filling, sealing the pasta sheets together. Using a ravioli cutter, or 2 ½” round cutter, cut out the ravioli. Place ravioli on a plastic wrap lined baking sheet, which has been floured generously. Sprinkle with AP flour or semolina and refrigerate until ready to cook.

Sage Butter Sauce

3 tablespoons shallots, minced
½ cup dry, white wine
½ cup heavy cream
½ cup chicken stock
1 tablespoon lemon juice
4 tablespoons butter
2 teaspoons minced fresh sage
Salt & Pepper to taste

Sauté shallots in 2 tablespoons of butter, about 3-5 minutes. Add white wine, heavy cream, chicken stock and lemon juice. Simmer until sauce is reduced by half. Gently whisk in remaining butter, one tablespoon at a time, stirring constantly. Adding butter only until the previous addition has completely melted. Add sage. Salt and pepper to taste.

Cook the ravioli in a large pot of boiling, salted water, about 5 minutes, or until they rise to the surface. Drain well. Transfer ravioli to a serving bowl and sprinkle lightly with salt. Pour the sage butter sauce over the ravioli and sprinkle with as much Parmigiano-Reggiano as your little heart desires. Serves 6.



*If mascarpone is not available, substitute with Philadelphia Cream Cheese.

I often serve this with either Semolina or Olive bread. Old picture below; face palming.



Btw, this makes a lot! Non ti preoccupare, this also freezes quite well. Buon Appetito!

50 comments:

  1. Gorgeous! These refined ravioli look delicious and perfect! What wonderful loaves!

    Cheers and have a nice weekend,

    Rosa

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  2. Sol, sorry to burst your bubble....

    But your ravioli look heavenly, really really!

    I love their scalloped edges...
    Very pretty post!!!

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  3. Sol, you make beautiful ravioli, you little pasta-maker, you! I'm also impressed with your sage-growing skills. Personally, I've been accused of putting all plants I bring into my home on death row... But I digress. I'm going to attempt these ravioli and even the sauce. Gorgeous!

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  4. How can you like my photos?
    :)

    Yours are just sheer heaven.
    I save them..
    I don't use them..I just save them and love them.

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  5. You know Rosa, aside from chocolate, I could easily live off carbs, and not much else.

    Kathleen, it's ok. This is not the first time I've needed a time-out.

    Lori, I've also been accused of killing almost every plant I've ever owned, so the thriving Sage proves that there's still hope for the anti Victory Garden-ers, among us.

    Monique, I don't know what to say. But I'm smiling as if I had just won the lottery.

    Thank you guys, very much. Enjoy your weekend!

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  6. I never knew ravioli and bread could be so pretty :). I'm jealous that you grew the sage! I would love to have a little herb garden. Have a wonderful weekend!

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  7. I've never made ravioli but your instructions make it seem possible. And so worth the effort. And your loaves of bread are beautiful.

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  8. Those ravioli look perfect! And the sauce sounds really good with the spinach filling!

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  9. ha! i love your fantasy. i often have the same exact one, especially as i'm trying to have a "calgon take me away" moment in my small brooklyn kitchen. sage butter sauce is one of my faves (esp. w/ gnocchi), but we don't use wine or cream - just browning of the butter w/ some sage leaves and a pinch of salt (maybe nutmeg). this looks even more decadent! beautiful pics...

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  10. That ravioli looks really good!

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  11. Thank you so much for your comment! I'm so glad to find others who value American made products. Have a wonderful weekend!

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  12. Hi everyone, I'm sorry I haven't had a chance to acknowledge any of the comments; I've been out of town, and got home last night.
    And I can't wait to see what everyone's been up to.

    Thank you all very much for your sweet and encouraging words; makes me want to take this blogging thing seriously ;-)

    Thanks again, very kindly!

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  13. Yum, yum, yummy, dear Marysol ~ not only a fan of creative gifts from your gifted kitchen but a also a huge fan of your photos! A lover of herbs and spinach, this recipe is memorable and tucked in my file. I must admit, have not made homemade pasta in ages ... actually, when my youngest son (now 26) got a boombox (10-11 yr. older brother & sister insisted) for his 12th birthday, he traded it in for a food dehydater and pasta maker & cranked out fab meals for the whole family ... now a financial advisor in trending Grosse Pte, he'd die hearing this story, so don't let on I told you :) You've tempted me ... time to resurrect the old pasta machine!

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  14. Somehow I doubt that is what you looked like making this beautiful ravioli, Marysol :)

    What a lovely post and beautiful photos! Sage blooming inside your home? Lucky you!

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  15. WOW, Sol, this one has me speechless! Just don't tell Larry that, or Kathleen. She'd never believe it :) You are awesome! Totally awesome!

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  16. Your ravioli are so cute. I just want to pinch their cheeks!

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  17. Those looks scrumptious! I've had a similar fantasy about living in a small village in the south of France amidst fields of lavender.

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  18. Your ravioli looks so delicious! :)

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  19. The ravioli look so good and beautiful too. I left my poor sage outside and hopefully they will make a full recovery this Spring. I think I have a black thumb instead of a green thumb and the irony is that I am a botany teacher!

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  20. Well, sure, the recipes sound terrific, the food pics are mouth watering and gorgeous as always but what I want to see are the pics of you in that outfit :)

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  21. Dear Susan, thanks again, for the heads up on the "leave a comment" issue.
    Apparently, this seems to be a problem affecting quite a few bloggers. Sigh.

    Apologies in advance to anyone who may be having difficulty leaving a comment here.

    Sweet Joey, I'm equally impressed with your many talents, but you already knew that. Clearly, your son takes after you. No wonder you're proud of him. And so am I. Still, the shameless little imp in me hopes he'll stumble onto this someday [G]
    You know, I didn't have the slightest interest in cooking while in my twenties.
    Baking, yes. Cooking, not so much.
    And it didn't help that the Complete Idiots Guide to Cooking had yet to be published.
    Anyway, pasta, was considered fresh if it was cooked a few days before the expiration date, on the box.
    But, a change took place the day I got my first pasta maker, and I've been making my own pasta ever since.
    Sadly, I can't say the same about the food dehydrator. That one is still somewhere in my basement, gathering dust.


    :) Susan, I consider it pure luck that my Sage has actually survived this long. And, being the proud mom that I am, I have to say this herb has the prettiest blooms I have ever seen.

    Carol, surely thou jest. For I doth believe-eth you're a pretty awesome cook yourself - deal with that.

    Jessica, funny you should say that. The ravioli reminds me of Scrubbing Bubbles.
    And I swear I haven't dropped acid.
    Hope you're still enjoying your vacation!


    Marc, I do declare, your fantasy sounds better than mine!
    Lavender is one of the few herbs I grow successfully, but always leave outside to fend for itself during our long winters. It's pretty tough though, and always comes back.

    Thank you Selba! I saved you some in the freezer.

    Robin! I didn't know you taught Botany. Boy, do I have a lot of questions for you. Run and hide.

    Annie, my sweet, I'll leave that to your lively i.m.a.g.i.n.a.t.i.o.n. Unveiling such an image, may cause blindness and deep emotional scarring.


    Thank you all for streaming a little sunshine into my blog!

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  22. The ravioli look wonderful and I can't believe that you got a sage plant to bloom indoors!! I've been slowly murdering my one rosemary that I pray will hold out until I can get it in the ground in the spring.

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  23. Maggie, you must believe me, I had nothing to do with this.
    Apparently, Mother Nature had pity on me, and kept the Sage alive, and for that, I'm grateful.
    May your Rosemary prayers be answered!

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  24. Be still my heart! Oh, I can only imagine how good that tastes!!!

    Sol, you're amazing (for a virgin, that is) :-)

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  25. Your photography and ideas are wonderful. Thank you for sharing your love of life on the web with me. Warm Wishes from my garden in the Midwest.

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  26. Marysol, everything looks beautiful! I love the ravioli and the buns. They would make the perfect meal!

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  27. I absolutely adore fresh ravioli. Yours looks fantastic - I love that you put a little sage leaf on each one.

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  28. wow i thought i left a comment the first day... darn, i am sure i went on and on at your great talent and stuff, but i just don't have that kind of time to praise you so often you know... great job on your pillows of pleasure, too bad i can't expound over your massive talents anymore, its a shame, becasue i really admire everything you touch...

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  29. Oh Lordy, would you look at that! The cream and wine are fabulous additions, and my own humble version suddenly seems the poor cousin. Sigh.

    As always I am humbled by the cooking and the photography. Have a great week ahead, Marisol :)

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  30. I think any Italian would be proud to confer honorary Italian status on you for your beautiful ravioli!

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  31. Kathy thanks! But, what would be truly amazing is if I were really a virgin!

    Bren, what a kind, and lovely comment you left! Thank you.

    Chuck, coming from the King of Breads, I'm delighted (and needless to say, humbled) you feel that way!

    Nic, I still have more than enough ravioli in the freezer, come on over!


    Jain, I'm sorry you feel that way. And, as you know, I am in the same boat. There are hundreds of bloggers I admire, but feel bad when I can't always leave a comment on their blogs.
    It is physically impossible to do, unless I, either went without sleep, or hired my own staff to cover everyone on my long list of favorites.

    Why do you think I'm the only blogger in the blogosphere who only has time to post every 3 to 4 weeks?

    So, I understand your predicament. And I'll miss your comments. But, I won't miss you, because I will continue to drop by your blog, as I have done, since the day I first stumbled onto it.
    Given a choice PQ, I would rather have your friendship, over an obligatory praise. And that's the troof.


    Dee, I'm beginning to think your last wedding creation must've had an effect on you [G]. But, I would happily enlist myself as your personal guinea pig in taste tests, any day of the week.

    Lynn, I have some wonderful Italian friends, so, considering the fact that I'm Spanish, I am totally flattered.


    Thank you all dear friends!

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  32. Sage butter sauce, sounds heavenly delicious :)

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  33. wow! The ravioli looks so cute and well made. Love your photos as always, they are always so elegant.

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  34. Zita and NC, thank you both very kindly!

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  35. Beautiful blog Sol! But then I knew it would be seeing as you are so talented. That ravioli looks heavenly and gracias for the visit to my blog. Nice to see you again! Sharon.

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  36. Wow, those ravioli looked really nice! Beautiful pictures.

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  37. Sharon, your wonderful blog makes me feel like I'm vacationing, without ever leaving my desk.

    Kelly, I just visited your blog, and it's quite a treat for the eyes, as I'm sure it is for the palate.

    Thank you both very much for your comments.

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  38. Jonathan Braese11/3/09

    Hello Marysol,

    My name is Jonathan Braese with See's Candies. I stumbled upon your blog via a comment you left on Lovely Lynn's giveaway (Cookie Baker Lynn).

    We're interested in discussing with you the possibility of working together in some form or fashion. If it's something you think you'd enjoy, please let me know, I'm happy to answer any questions you may have, and I hope to hear from you soon.

    Thanks for your time,

    -Jon
    jbraese@sees.com


    p.s. I'm sorry I used your comment section, I couldn't find an email address to reach out to you, so please, feel free to delete these shenanigans.

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  39. Your ravioli look perfect! Me parece muy delicioso tambien:)

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  40. Oh this look like the perfect past dish!
    I often live in a bubble. However it is always quickly deflated!

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  41. Mmm fresh pasta! Your ravioli look delicious.

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  42. ... and so I've returned, starved, wanting to eat your post! But it's the spring equinox, a glorious day in Michigan, and could not let the day pass withoug wishing you ... Happy Spring, dear friend! (Look at all your fans ... when will your cookbook be published :)

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  43. Guys, thank you very kindly for your encouraging words!

    And now that Spring is in the air, I'll be coming out, of hibernation, that is.

    And to my friend Joey, if I ever write a cookbook, would you please be so kind as to write the preface?

    Thank you everyone!

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  44. I'm sur you'll like these lasagne! I recommend you to make the sauces first (the day before) and the pasta sheets on the day you assemble the dish...

    Cheers and have a great weekend,

    Rosa

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  45. Hello,


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    Best regards,

    Vincent
    petitchef.com

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  46. Vincent, thank you for the invite, I'll check it out.

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  47. Marysol,
    Those raviolis looks very tempting... I can almost smell this sage butter :)

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  48. The raviolis look so wonderful! I may have to make that my new challenge! To make ravioli!

    I've tackled bread and yogurt but now I'm looking for something new!
    Your sage butter sauce was absolutely delicious!
    The perfect thing to accompany my dinner tonight.
    Thanks!

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  49. Made your ravioli recipe this past weekend and was blown away - they were incredible! Thanks for sharing and hope you like my write up on them - http://5spoons.wordpress.com/2012/01/22/spinach-ravioli-with-sage-butter-sauce-recipe/

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  50. Thank you for the feedback 5spoons; so happy you liked them!

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